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The benefits of having your pet neutered!
Did you know that in addition to preventing unwanted pregnancies, there are other health benefits to having your pet neutered and we’ve outlined some of these below: Dogs: In female dogs, heat periods (or seasons) usually occur twice a year and last about three weeks. During this time, your dog will be receptive to the advances of un-neutered male dogs in your area. In both sexes, the urge to mate can lead to roaming, with the associated risk of becoming permanently lost, getting involved in fights or, worse still, being injured in a road accident. Cats: Female cats come into heat as often as every two weeks during the breeding season (in the spring and summer months) and will endlessly try to escape to mate with local tom cats. Male (tom) cats, particularly if not neutered, will mark their territory by ‘spraying’ objects inside and outside your house with strong smelling urine. In addition, they are frequently involved in fights, resulting in bite injuries and the risk of acquiring deadly viral infections. Sexual contact can also lead to transmission of deadly viruses as well. In females, neutering (spaying), involves removing the ovaries and uterus under a general anaesthetic. As well as preventing seasons and unwanted pregnancies, spaying also removes the possibility of life-threatening uterine infections. Additionally, it also greatly reduces the risk of developing potentially fatal mammary tumours later in life. In males, neutering (castration), involves removal of both testes under a general anaesthetic. Neutering makes male pets less likely to stray, and in dogs, can be of help in controlling excessive sexual drive and with certain types of behavioural problems. Neutered male cats are far less likely to get into fights and urine spray.

Rabbits may also benefit from being neutered. As well as preventing unwanted pregnancies, they are generally calmer and can be more easily kept in social groups without fighting. Additionally, spaying removes the risk of uterine cancer which is common in older unspayed females.

If you would like more information on neutering, or to book an operation, please give us a call!


LUNGWORM ALERT
Slugs and snails love warmer, wet weather and as well as being very bad news for gardeners, they can also spell trouble for dogs. Slugs and snails can carry the larvae of the life threatening lungworm parasite Angiostrongylus vasorum. This is a problem for dog owners since dogs may unwittingly swallow infected snails and slugs (or their slime trails) whilst exploring parks and gardens. Once swallowed, the larvae migrate to the heart where they will develop into adult worms.

The adult lungworms live in the heart and those blood vessels supplying the lungs. Here, they lay their eggs, which hatch into larvae and migrate into the airways of the lungs. Affected pets may show a range of symptoms including: coughing, reluctance to exercise, weight loss, fits, diarrhoea and clotting problems. The disease can be potentially fatal. To complete the life cycle, the larvae that have migrated to the lungs are in turn, coughed up, swallowed and passed out in the dogs faeces. As the faeces break down, the larvae are then eaten by slugs and snails. Lungworm is not prevented by routine wormers against roundworms and tapeworms, so in addition to these, we also recommend specific treatment aimed at preventing lungworm. It is also vitally important to clean up after your dog in the garden and on walks to prevent the spread of worms.

If you have any questions about how to protect your dog from Lungworm, do not hesitate to contact us on 023 8026 8001.


Is your pet microchipped?
It’s a sad fact that hundreds of pets go missing every day and many are never reunited with their owners for one simple reason – tragically they cannot be reliably identified. However the good news is that, in addition to the traditional collar and tag (which doesn’t always stay in place), you can now have your pet permanently identified with a tiny microchip, giving you the best chance of being reunited with your pet, should they go missing.

A range of pets can be microchipped, including dogs, cats, small pets, birds and even tortoises! A microchip is hardly bigger than a grain of rice and having it implanted is quick and simple. Just like a normal injection, it is inserted under the skin at the back of the neck and, once there, it lasts a lifetime. Each microchip carries a unique code which, together with information about your pet and contact details, are held on a central computer database. Should your pet go missing, when found, the chip can be ‘read’ using special hand held scanners. Veterinary practices, the police and animal welfare organisations routinely scan all strays, hopefully ensuring that if the unthinkable happens, you and your pet can be speedily reunited.

So don’t take any chances, get in touch with us and get your pet microchipped today.


A Guide To Puppies
VACCINATIONS : Puppies should be vaccinated at 6-8 weeks and again at 10 weeks. These vaccinations will protect your puppy from potentially fatal diseases – parvovirus, leptospirosis, hepatitis, distemper, parainfluenza, adenovirus. The vaccine provides your puppy with antibodies to help fight the diseases. Yearly boosters throughout the life of your dog will be required to keep the level of antibodies at a protective level.

WORMING : Should be done with Advocate spot on every month until your puppy is 6 months old. Then ask us for further advice. Worms (roundworm and tapeworm) can be picked up by your puppy when sniffing and walking where other dogs have been. The dog will then clean itself and ingest worm eggs and larvae which remain alive for months and sometimes years after they have been passed. Worms are not always obvious unless the animal has a heavy worm burden so remember – just because you can’t see them doesn’t mean that they’re not there!

FLEAS : Treat every 4 weeks with Advocate and use Indorex (an environmental spray) as required around the home. This will protect your puppy from adult fleas and your home against flea eggs and larvae. Remember, fleas are not only unpleasant for you and your puppy but can also cause potentially serious health problems in some cases eg anaemia, and fleas also carry tapeworm.

NEUTERING :Females – 3 months after the end of the 1st season. Having your bitch spayed will reduce the risk of mammary tumours and prevent womb infections.

Males– Between 6 and 24 months. Prevents testicular cancer, prostate cancer and other associated illnesses and also helps reduce undesirable behaviour. If you wish to discuss the procedure, please do not hesitate to contact us.

MICROCHIPPING : A small microchip, about the size of a grain of rice is implanted under the skin of the neck. In the event of the animal going missing, and being rescued, the animal can be scanned by the dog warden, at veterinary surgeries, RSPCA or other rescue centres and you will then be contacted. For example – 1) Dog goes missing 2) Picked up by dog warden or handed in to vets or rescue centre 3) Scanned 4) Ring database 5) Call you to collect your dog.

FEEDING : Always feed a good quality brand of complete puppy food, well balanced with the correct nutrition your puppy needs. We recommend Hills Vet Essentials, as it provides a full range of life stage foods from puppy to adult, to senior.

INSURANCE : We recommend that you insure your puppy with Pet Plan. You will find some information in your record file which you will be given at first vaccination. If you have any queries, please speak to Sharon , our insurance administrator.

PREMIER HEALTH PLAN : The Premier Health Plan allows you to spread the cost of routine treatment not covered by insurance (eg vaccinations, worming, flea treatment) at a discount of up to 40% plus you will also receive discounts on other items and services. Please see our Premier Health Plan web page for details.

SOCIALISATION: The first 16 weeks are a very important “formative period” in your puppy’s life. Try and devote as much time as possible in this period to developing the human-pet bond. Do this by handling (including feet, ears, grooming and teeth brushing) , play, training and socialisation.

PUPPY CHECKLIST

6-8 WEEKS * First vaccination * Worming * Flea Treatment * Ring and arrange puppy Classes. * Toilet Training * Insurance * Weight

10 WEEKS : * Second vaccination (make a note that booster will be required before 1 year from today) * Worming * Microchip * Weight

12 WEEKS (2 weeks after second vaccination) * Preparing to take puppy outside * Puppy training classes * Weekly checking of your pet’s eyes, ears, teeth, body condition * Weight * Flea treatment

4 MONTHS: * Worming *Weigh * Flea treatment

5 MONTHS: * Worming *Weigh * Flea treatment

6 MONTHS : * Worming *Weigh * Flea treatment * Ensure weekly checks are going well * Neutering pro’s & con’s

Bring your puppy for a free monthly health check with Michele, our practice nurse, where you will be able to discuss any queries you may have.


A Guide To Kittens
VACCINATIONS : Kittens should be vaccinated at 8-9 weeks and again at 12 weeks. These vaccinations will protect your kitten from potentially fatal diseases – Flu, Enteritis and Leukaemia. The vaccine provides your kitten with antibodies to help fight the diseases. Yearly boosters throughout the life of your cat will be required to keep the level of antibodies at a protective level.

WORMING : Should be done monthly with Stronghold spot on until your kitten is 6 months old. Then ask us for further advice.Worms (roundworm and tapeworm) can be picked up by your kitten when sniffing and walking where other cats have been. The cat will then clean itself and ingest worm eggs and larvae which remain alive for months and sometimes years after they have been passed. Worms are not always obvious unless the animal has a heavy worm burden so remember – just because you can’t see them doesn’t mean that they’re not there!

FLEAS: Treat every 4 weeks with Stronghold spot on and use Indorex spray as required around the home. This will protect your kitten from adult fleas and your home against flea eggs and larvae. Remember, fleas are not only unpleasant for you and your kitten but can also cause potentially serious health problems in some cases eg anaemia, and fleas also carry tapeworm.

NEUTERING : It is advisable to arrange for your kitten to be neutered at 6 months of age. If you wish to discuss the procedure, please do not hesitate to contact us.

MICROCHIPPING : A small microchip, about the size of a grain of rice is implanted under the skin at the back of the neck. In the event of the animal going missing, and being picked up, the animal can be scanned at veterinary surgeries, RSPCA or other rescue centres and you will then be contacted. For example – 1) Cat goes missing 2) Picked up by or handed in to vets or rescue centre 3) Scanned 4) Ring database 5) Call you to collect your cat.

FEEDING : Always feed a good quality brand of complete kitten food, well balanced with the correct nutrition your kitten's needs. We recommend Hills Vet Essentials as it provides a full range of life stage foods from kitten to adult, to senior.

INSURANCE : We recommend that you insure your kitten with Pet Plan. You will find some information in your record file which you will be given at first vaccination.

PREMIER HEALTH PLAN : With the Premier Health Plan you can spread the cost of routine treatment not covered by insurance (eg vaccinations, worming, flea treatment) at a discount plus you will also receive discounts on other items and services. See our Premier Health Plan page for more information.

SOCIALISATION: The first 20 weeks are an important “formative period” in your kitten’s life. Try and devote as much time as possible in this period to developing the human-pet bond. Do this by handling, play, socialisation, grooming and teeth brushing.

KITTEN CHECKLIST:

 8-9 WEEKS * First Vaccination * Worming * Flea Treatment * Insurance * Weight

12 WEEKS * Second vaccination (make a note that booster will be required before 1 year from today) *Worming * Microchip * Weight

14 WEEKS (2 weeks after second vaccination) * Preparing to let kitten outside (The first few times, it is advisable that you let your kitten out, supervised and on an empty stomach and recall them with food).

WEEKLY - * Checking of your pet’s eyes, ears, teeth, body condition* Weight

4 MONTHS Weigh * Worming * Flea treatment

5 MONTHS Weigh* Worming * Flea treatment * Neutering

6 MONTHS Weigh * Worming * Flea treatment * Neuter. Ensure weekly checks are going well.

Bring your kitten for a free monthly visit to see Michele, our practice nurse, where all the above will be checked.


We encourage you to use the website as a source of information as it will be updated regularly to ensure that the latest contact details, opening hours and information on our services are always at your fingertips.

Village Vets In Chandlers Ford

5 Pilgrims CloseChandler's FordHampshireSO53 4ST023 8026 8001find us


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